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Mary A. Mason Education Foundation 8
International Festival Cultural Presentation 16
Taste of Liberia 17

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International Festival Cultural Presentation 16
Mary A. Mason Education Foundation 8
Taste of Liberia 17

About Us

The Republic of Liberia is located on the West Coast of Africa, surrounded by Sierra Leone, Guinea and Cote d'Ivoire.  This nation  formed in 1847, suffered a civil crisis that started in 1989 and lasted 14 years.  Infrastructure, health and social services were  decimated.  An entire generation has been rendered illiterate because of the lack of consistent education.  Treatable diseases have reeked havoc because of a lack of basic medical supplies.  Despite these woes, the Republic of Liberia is in the process of renewing itself.  With a newly elected President, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf (Africa's first elected female President) in 2003, plans have been established and implementation has been ongoing.  A development program that began with consultations at the village, town, district and finally county level, was consolidated into a National Poverty Reduction Strategy.  NGOs and foreign aid have stepped in to handle the major tasks in the effort to rebuild. Normality is  returning to urban and rural areas however, long-term success requires Liberians to proactively engage in the process.  The countless 

schools and clinics in the rural areas are not always benefiting from development efforts aimed to make a national impact.  These small gaps represent effects on real people.  People that need hope in the future and encouragement  to improve their own situation.  The areas of Education and Health stand as prominent areas of interest  on the micro level.  A little help on a constistent basis goes a long way in Liberia.   It takes the edge off of an already difficulty situation.  

Liberians living in the diaspora have found themselves in a unique position to assist their homeland in such efforts, while serving as ambassadors for cultural exchange between Liberia and the world.  The United States of America hosts the largest population of Liberians outside of Africa.   The history of both nations are tightly intertwined.  It is this unique relationship that compells mutual cooperation and understanding.  In terms of assistance to Liberia, developing a sense of responsibility is key.  Serving as the vanguard to rebirth is critical.  In wake of these compounding issues, the Liberia Progress Foundation was founded in 2009 and registered as a non-Profit with the State of Indiana on May 3, 2010.

Our Logo encapsulates our motivation, 
core values and aspirations.

 

  • The Brown outer ring represents the fertile soil of growth and persistence
     
  • The inner and outer gold rings represent integrity and resourcefulness, encasing the name which clearly states the intent of the organization
     
  • With an inner circle representing the dark blue night of despair before dawn
     
  • The Butterfly signifies transformation and renewal of our homeland which is depicted as a gradient red of struggle to the hope of an emerging light; 
     
  • With the lone star guiding us to higher aspirations.
     
  • The male and female figures represent a collaborative spirit of humility, civility and professionalism.

 

school

Every effort counts toward the ultimate goal.  No matter how small or insignificant the effort appears. The Liberia Progress Foundation was formed by Liberians residing in the United States who realized a need for charitable assistance to Liberia.  Our main area of focus is education in rural Liberia.  By making education attainable in these areas we can help to decentralize development efforts.  We provide educational assistance and humanitarian support through the dedicated efforts of Liberians and friends of Liberia.  

 
Through our promotion of cultural diversity in the United States we strive to improve the image of Liberia, by highlighting the rich culture of our country.  As we live in the United States or any part of the world, we are ambassadors to Liberia.  We have the responsibility to improve this area of the world and help uplift it to its highest potential.  
 
As we strive to increase our material support we are aware of the significance of the intangible feeling of hope that is created when people in the rural areas receive assistance and encouragement.  As we bring in supplies we bring in hope, diminishing the feeling of despair. We want to see this slow trickle of hope develop into a tsunami effect of confidence and development in the coming generations.  We have to start small and build, utilizing the essential build-block of all societies … the education of its children.  This is the mandate of the Liberia Progress Foundation.

 

 

 
Siah Fallah-Brown
Chair-Lady
22
Trocon Tora Karmo
Vice-Chair
23
Alma K. Smith
Treasurer
24
Varnie N'jola Karmo
Secretary
21
  • Return to List

Siah Fallah-Brown

Chair-Lady

Siah Fallah-Brown serves as the Chair-Lady of the organization. She has a background in Nursing from the University of Indianapolis, Indiana. As a nurse for 14 years, Siah has worked as a staff nurse, educator and a nursing leader. She served on the Vestry Board at St John’s Episcopal church in Speedway, Indiana and also served as Treasurer of the Liberian Association of Indiana before becoming President for two years.

 

Siah is currently working as a Clinical Charge Nurse for Wished Health Services. Her passion is to serve the under privileged in America and around the world. As the need for basic health care and education rises in Liberia, Siah feels blessed to have been given this opportunity to give back to her home country.

 

22

Trocon Tora Karmo

Vice-Chair

Trocon Karmo serves as the Vice-Chairman of the organization. His background as a manager for 11 years, gave him the opportunity to see how the progress of employees and people in the community were restricted because of lack of basic necessities.

 

He feels fortunate to earn a degree from the Indiana University School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA) and to work to support his family. This has personally motivated him to give back to those who are in desperate need in Liberia. Trocon also volunteered for two years assisting people in Indiana to file their tax returns.

 

"My passion is to share my fairness, work ethic and the vision of the Liberia Progress Foundation in order to motivate children in Liberia and America."

 

His experience as a counselor at St. Vincent Stress Center gives him the knowledge to help people in the community who are psychologically distressed. With his background from the School of SPEA, Trocon understands that deplorable conditions do not facilitate proper education and health.

 

23

Alma K. Smith

Treasurer

Alma Smith serves as the Treasurer of the organization. She has recently retired after 25 years in Office Administration from Anthem Blue Cross/Blue Shield. Mrs. Smith served previously for six years as the Treasurer for Saint Albans Episcopal Church in Indianapolis. Mrs. Smith was the initial spark which ignited the organization. Her vision to do philanthropic work for Liberia drove her to seek like minded hard working team members in order to form the organization.

 

Her experience also includes over 10 years of service in Liberia at the Liberian American Mining Company(LAMCO), where she served as Community Service Manager/Travel Officer. During her tenure both at LAMCO and Anthem, she was known for her ability to organize and motivate people for action. Also known to advocate for personal responsibility in regards to supporting Liberia, Mrs. Smith has personally supported students in Liberia over the years financially.

 

"I push strongly for all young people to focus on their education, because once you have your education no one can take that away from you. Education allows you to improve your life and the lives of others. This is paramount!"

 

24

Varnie N'jola Karmo

Secretary

Varnie N'jola Karmo serves as the Secretary of the organization. He has a background in Information Systems from the Purdue University School of Technology. He has volunteered in his community helping people with computer related issues, tutoring and personal motivation.

 

Varnie has worked in the field of Information Technology for the past 18 years. He is currently employed as a Senior Systems Analyst for the State of Indiana. His drive to work with this organization stems from the awesome responsibility that we all share to improve the lives of those that find themselves in an unfortunate position

 

"Where poverty and despair is found, there too you will find an opportunity to uplift through positive engagement. Self wealth and prosperity is emptiness while others suffer."

 

Varnie believes that being grounded in your cultural background is your spring board to greatness. It gives you the the courage to achieve based on your belief that you have the capability, because of who you are and where you come from. These are personal motivations which compel Varnie to work tirelessly for the goals and vision of the Liberia Progress Foundation.

 

21
Dr. Elwood Dunn
Board Member
Cordelia Tweh
Board Member
Jonathon Nimrod
Board Member
Boie Corvah
Board Member
Jodie Little
Board Member

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2013http://www.liberiaprogress.org/sites/default/files/reports/2013_Yearend%20_Rpt.pdf
2012http://www.liberiaprogress.org/sites/default/files/reports/2012%20LPF%20Financial%20Report_0.xlsx
2011http://www.liberiaprogress.org/sites/default/files/reports/2011%20LPF%20Financial%20Report.xlsx
2010http://www.liberiaprogress.org/sites/default/files/reports/2010%20LPF%20Financial%20Report.xlsx
Free Community Clinic
148

Free Community Clinic

The final goal requires $50,000 to build a clinic.  For this project, a partnership with Africare, a NonGovernmental Organization, will be sought.  Once the clinic is constructed, we will turn it over to Africare, who will then operate the clinic at no cost to the villagers.

Public Restroom
147

Public Restroom

The second objective requires the following:

  • $1500 to build a four stall public bathroom with septic tanks
  • $7000 to dig a bore well and build a water tower
After School Program
146

After School Program

The following items are being sought:

  • Used clothing and shoes for all ages
  • Laptops, nooks, and kindle fires: used but in working condition
  • School supplies
  • Cash to help ship the items to Liberia and to purchase a small generator

 

PROJECT STATUS
Donations received $1,118.86
3 Nook Tablets Received  
Total Received $1,118.86

 

2013 Nursing Book Drive
144

The quality of a school depends to a great extent upon the information available to its students through a school's library. The lack of funds and inflation are two primary factors restricting the purchase of medical and nursing books for the Library at The Tubman National Institute of Medical Arts (TNIMA) in Liberia. We are collaborating through Cynthia Bondoe, a Nursing Instructor from TNIMA, to replenish the medical and nursing references with books collected in the United States to be shipped to Liberia. Ms Bondoe is currently pursuing her masters in Nursing Education at IUPUI School of Nursing. It is our aim to provide up-to-date nursing publications required to aid the students at TNIMA. With the latest knowledge available in the medical field, these students will be in a position to receive quality education and eventually deliver quality medical services to the people of Liberia. Many of Liberia’s educational buildings and materials were destroyed during the fifteen year civil war. It is time to help in the rebuilding process. The Liberian Government and the major NGOs cannot do this work alone. Liberia is in need of well qualified medical professionals. Through TNIMA, the Liberia Progress Foundation is willing to provide the needed support to promote an effective nursing book drive for 2013. Ms Bondoe will be returning to Liberia in August 2013 and we plan to send the first shipment in July 2013. We are asking for your support by donating medical books or by making a monetary contribution for the purchase and shipment of the books. Please mail your tax deductible donation in the enclosed envelope or visit our web site http://liberiaprogress.org and make a donation online. If you have books to donate you can also send us a note through our web site under the Getting Involved section, email us at contact@liberiaprogress.org or call 317-721-2575.

 

 

 

INDY International Festival
125

 


 
WHERE: West Pavilion - Indiana State Fairgrounds
Indianapolis, IN
Get Directions
 
WHEN:

SCHOOL HOURS:
Nov 15 ..... 10am - 2pm
Nov 16 ..... 10am - 2pm
 

GENERAL PUBLIC HOURS:
Nov 16 ..... 2pm - 9pm
Nov 17 ..... 10am - 9pm
Nov 18 ..... Noon - 6pm

 

INFO LINKS: Fast Facts | Buy Tickets |Schools | Entertainment Schedule | Photos  
 

 

 

 

Liberian National Symbols
104

The flag which bears a striking resemblance to the American flag is an indication of the historical connection between the two nations. Freed slaves who settled along the West Coast of Africa initiated the formation of the country now called Liberia.

The star represents freedom. The blue field represents the continent of Africa. The eleven stripes signify the eleven signatories of the Declaration of Independence. Red for the courage and white for moral excellence of these signatories.

The Coat of Arms contains the motto: The Love of Liberty Brought us Here. The dove carrying the scroll represents a breath of peace. The ship in water represents the vessel which brought the freed slaves to Africa. The plow and shovel represent the dignity of labor which will lead to a prosperous nation. The versatile palm tree represents prosperity. The rising sun represents the birth of a nation.

Liberian Ethnic Map
103

Technically there are 16 to 28 ethnic groups in Liberia, depending on the inclusion of sub groups. In general however the various ethnic groups can be grouped into 4 major groups. The Kwa, Mel, Mande, and Repatriated Africans migrated to the west coast in waves over the centuries.

The Kwa speaking people includes the Dei, Bassa, Kru, Krahn, Belle, Grebo, and Sapo. They migrated along the west coast from further south. The Kwa first settled the region. The Mel speaking includes Gola and Kissi. This group migrated from Central Africa region and arrived second in the region. These two groups were followed by the Mande from the western Sudan.

The Mande includes the Vai, Mende, Mandingo, Lorma, Kpelle, Mano, and Gio. The final group, the repatriated Africans includes freed slaves from the diaspora and the Congo. This is ethnic mosaic that makes up the fabric of Liberia, a nation with a rich cultural background.

Liberian Indigenous Scripts
102

Liberia is host to six(6) indigenous scripts (Bassa, Vai, Gola, Kpelle, Lorma and Mende). The origin of each of the scripts is shrouded in mystery. Of the six(6) scripts the Bassa and Vai are still actively used in public. One of the origin stories of the Bassa script tell of a one Di Wada, a Bassa man who used the script to communicate with one of the chiefs wives. When he was discovered, he was sold into slavery as punishment.

Di Wada's descendants would continue to use the script in Brazil, until discovered by a Liberian Bassa, Dr. Flo Narvin Lewis, traveling with missionaries. He came back to Liberia and discovered that the script was still being used in the villages by certain people.

Dr. Lewis met with the elders in various towns in order to standardize the symbols. He later created a printing press in Germany that was to be used in Liberia to print books and newspapers using the Bassa script.

How Old Is Liberia?
101

The Republic of Liberia was officially established in 1847 after a period of influx of repatriated Africans.  With the assistance of the American Colonization Society, the United States Navy, and the agreement of reluctant indigenous chiefs of the Grain Coast, Africa's first republic was born.  This new nation was formed a mere 71 years after the establishment of the United States in 1776.

The people who make up the nation of Liberia, populated the region from 1000 A.D.-1800 A.D.   All population groups in Liberia migrated from elsewhere seeking a better life.  Joseph Jenkins Roberts was the first President of Liberia. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf is the 24th President.

President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf
100

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf was elected as the 24th President of the Republic of Liberia in 2005. With an ancestry of Gola on her Grandfather's side and Kru/German on her Grandmother's side, she has struggled for most of her life to improve conditions in Liberia. Both of her parents were born into poverty; her father in Julijua, Bomi County and her mother in Greenville.

Ellen Johnson's father, Jahmale Carney Johnson, was the son of the Gola Chief named Jahmale and one of his wives Jenneh. Her grandmother, Juah Sarwee was married to a German who fled the country during World War II. Her educational background includes a Masters from Harvard.

Sirleaf's public resume includes Assistant Finance Minister for the Tolbert administration. She ran for Vice-President in 1985 and President in 1997, before a bid in the 2005 elections, which resulted in her being elected as the President of Liberia, the first female elected President in Africa.

Contact Us
97

MAILING ADDRESS

Liberia Progress Foundation, Inc.
P.O. Box 53772
Indianapolis, IN 46253

 

PHONE

317.721.2575


EMAIL

contact@liberiaprogress.org

 

Outreach to Bomi County
96

In July of 2012, the Liberia Progress Foundation shipped sample school supplies to three(3) schools in Senje District, Bomi County.  Our preliminary survey identified schools in Besao, Jawajei, and Gaya Hill as well as a clinic in Gaya Hill. Our current level of support involves sending school supplies for students and basic medical supplies to clinics.

We hope to complete a needs assessment by October of this year in preparation for assistance.  The proximity of the schools and clinic offers a great opportunity to have a compelling effect in the area.  We will continue to provide status on our on going efforts in Bomi County.

LPF Mission
29
school

Every effort counts toward the ultimate goal.  No matter how small or insignificant the effort appears. The Liberia Progress Foundation was formed by Liberians residing in the United States who realized a need for charitable assistance to Liberia.  Our main area of focus is education in rural Liberia.  By making education attainable in these areas we can help to decentralize development efforts.  We provide educational assistance and humanitarian support through the dedicated efforts of Liberians and friends of Liberia.  

 
Through our promotion of cultural diversity in the United States we strive to improve the image of Liberia, by highlighting the rich culture of our country.  As we live in the United States or any part of the world, we are ambassadors to Liberia.  We have the responsibility to improve this area of the world and help uplift it to its highest potential.  
 
As we strive to increase our material support we are aware of the significance of the intangible feeling of hope that is created when people in the rural areas receive assistance and encouragement.  As we bring in supplies we bring in hope, diminishing the feeling of despair. We want to see this slow trickle of hope develop into a tsunami effect of confidence and development in the coming generations.  We have to start small and build, utilizing the essential build-block of all societies … the education of its children.  This is the mandate of the Liberia Progress Foundation.

 

 

 
LPF Background
28

The Republic of Liberia is located on the West Coast of Africa, surrounded by Sierra Leone, Guinea and Cote d'Ivoire.  This nation  formed in 1847, suffered a civil crisis that started in 1989 and lasted 14 years.  Infrastructure, health and social services were  decimated.  An entire generation has been rendered illiterate because of the lack of consistent education.  Treatable diseases have reeked havoc because of a lack of basic medical supplies.  Despite these woes, the Republic of Liberia is in the process of renewing itself.  With a newly elected President, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf (Africa's first elected female President) in 2003, plans have been established and implementation has been ongoing.  A development program that began with consultations at the village, town, district and finally county level, was consolidated into a National Poverty Reduction Strategy.  NGOs and foreign aid have stepped in to handle the major tasks in the effort to rebuild. Normality is  returning to urban and rural areas however, long-term success requires Liberians to proactively engage in the process.  The countless 

schools and clinics in the rural areas are not always benefiting from development efforts aimed to make a national impact.  These small gaps represent effects on real people.  People that need hope in the future and encouragement  to improve their own situation.  The areas of Education and Health stand as prominent areas of interest  on the micro level.  A little help on a constistent basis goes a long way in Liberia.   It takes the edge off of an already difficulty situation.  

Liberians living in the diaspora have found themselves in a unique position to assist their homeland in such efforts, while serving as ambassadors for cultural exchange between Liberia and the world.  The United States of America hosts the largest population of Liberians outside of Africa.   The history of both nations are tightly intertwined.  It is this unique relationship that compells mutual cooperation and understanding.  In terms of assistance to Liberia, developing a sense of responsibility is key.  Serving as the vanguard to rebirth is critical.  In wake of these compounding issues, the Liberia Progress Foundation was founded in 2009 and registered as a non-Profit with the State of Indiana on May 3, 2010.

What's in a Logo
27

Our Logo encapsulates our motivation, 
core values and aspirations.

 

  • The Brown outer ring represents the fertile soil of growth and persistence
     
  • The inner and outer gold rings represent integrity and resourcefulness, encasing the name which clearly states the intent of the organization
     
  • With an inner circle representing the dark blue night of despair before dawn
     
  • The Butterfly signifies transformation and renewal of our homeland which is depicted as a gradient red of struggle to the hope of an emerging light; 
     
  • With the lone star guiding us to higher aspirations.
     
  • The male and female figures represent a collaborative spirit of humility, civility and professionalism.

 

2010 Financial Report
26
2010 Financial Report
SUPPORT WE RECEIVED OUR ACCOMPLISHMENTS FUTURE PLANS
  • $1500 from June 23, 2010 Fundraiser honoring Dr. Korto Harris-Scott
  • 10 boxes of Medical supplies donated from the Goodness and Mercy Foundation
  • Sept. thru Dec. 2010 other financial contributions $940
  • School supplies to Ye Summo school in rural Liberia
  • Medical supplies donated by Goodness & Mercy Foundation, sent to Tubman Univ. Nursing School in Cape Palmas, Liberia
  • 2010 Cultural booth at the Indianapolis International Festival, focusing on the continent of Africa
  • Provide supplies to rural schools and assist with student tuition
  • Support school renovations at the James Cooper Institute
  • Taste of Liberian Food Fundraiser
  • Obtain 501(c)3 certification
Income Jul Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Total
Beginning Account Balance $0.00            
Donations $1,290.00 $750.00 $100.00 $150.00 $0.00 $150.00  
Total Income $1,290.00 $750.00 $100.00 $150.00 $0.00 $150.00 $2,440.00
Expenses              
Nationality Council of Indiana Dues $35.00            
International Festival Cultural Booth Fee         $128.00    
Video taping of Cultural Booth (WFYI)         $75.00    
Printing Materials cost for cultural Booth         $96.00    
Purchase Ye Sumo School Supplies $493.52            
Shipment Ye Sumo Supplies $150.00            
Purchase CMA James Cooper School Supplies         $138.00    
Shipment of CMA School Supplies         $70.00    
Shipment of donated medical supplies         $630.00    
Total Expenses $678.52 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $1,137.00 $0.00 $1,815.52
Balance              
              $624.48
2011 Financial Report
25
2011 Financial Report
SUPPORT WE RECEIVED OUR ACCOMPLISHMENTS FUTURE PLANS
  • Financial contributions from donors: $3,965
  • Dinner & Cultural Orientation for Goodness & Mercy Volunteers
  • School supplies to Ye Summo school in rural Liberia
  • 2011 Cultural booth and Taste of Liberia Food Fundraiser at the Indianapolis International Festival
  • Filed for 501(c)3 certification (pending)
  • Established Liberia Progress Foundation website
  • Support school renovations at the James Cooper Institute
  • Taste of Liberian Food Fundraiser & Cultural Booth at International Festival
  • Provide Liberian Food Preparation information on Web site
INCOME 1ST QUARTER 2ND QUARTER 3RD QUARTER 4TH QUARTER
Beginning Account Balance $916.49 $2,079.69 $1,189.69  $776.49 
Donations $1,485.00 $1,140.00 $620.00 $720.00
Total Income $2,401.49 $3,219.69 $1,809.69 $1,496.49
EXPENSES        
Website Domain Names $30.00      
Website Hosting Fees $186.80      
2011 Mail box Rental $70.00      
2011 Nationalities Council Membership Dues $35.00      
IRS 1023 Application Fee   $850.00    
Greenwalt Services(CPA) - 501(c)3 Application   $1,180.00     
International Festival 2011 Booth Expenses     $570.00 $367.25
2011 School Supplies and Shipment Costs     $463.20 $50.00
TOTAL EXPENSES $321.80 $2,030.00 $1,033.20 $417.25
BALANCE        
  $2,079.69  $1,189.69 $776.49   $1,079.24  
Ricebread Recipe
15
Message from the Chair-lady
14
James Cooper School Receives 2011 Fall Supplies
12
Mary A. Mason Primary School Receives Initial Supplies
11
Ye Sumo Distributes Donates School Supplies
6

Volunteering Your Time

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One Village at a Time Project

 In villages in Bong County, Liberia, children have limited clothes and clean drinking water is difficult to acquire. Health care is practically non-existent while schools are overcrowded, under staffed and have very little supplies. With all of these challenges the children of Tailor’s Town and the surrounding villages, are no different than children in the United States.

They have a strong sense of curiosity in all things new. Despite this strong desire to learn, their ability to advance is based solely on what the Liberian government can provide at this time. With all the major challenges of reconstruction, many of these young children will be not have an opportunity to impact the future of their families, Liberia nor the World.

Donation Button: 


 

After School Program

The following items are being sought:

  • Used clothing and shoes for all ages
  • Laptops, nooks, and kindle fires: used but in working condition
  • School supplies
  • Cash to help ship the items to Liberia and to purchase a small generator

 

PROJECT STATUS
Donations received $1,118.86
3 Nook Tablets Received  
Total Received $1,118.86